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Confederate Veteran article that African Americans are not citizens and should be shipped back to Africa.

 

Confederate Veteran, Vol. 33 No. 3, March 1925, page 116. The Confederate Veteran was the official publication of the United Confederate Veterans, United Daughters of the Confederacy, Confederated Southern Memorial Association, and the Sons of Confederate Veterans.  

 

 

NEGROES NOT CITIZENS.


Nation­wide interest has been aroused by a suit, filed in the Federal District Court of New Orleans, which seeks to enjoin Walter E. Cohen, negro comptroller of customs of that port, from exercising the duties of his office. The suit attacks the validity of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution as applied to negroes, and the bill alleges that Cohen is not a citizen of this country, but is “a person of African blood and descent, and is inherently incapable of being a citizen of the United States.”

 

H. Edwin Bolte, an attorney of Washington, D. C., in whose name the suit is brought, declares that the grounds upon which it is based have never been decided by the courts; that three-fourths of the States did not ratify the amendment, nor was it adopted by the required two-thirds of both houses of Congress; and he alleges that eleven States of the Union at the time of the adoption of the resolution culminating in the alleged Article XIV were unconstitutionally deprived of the equal suffrage in the Senate; that these States were by coercion forced to ratify it, and that Congress did, without power or authority, declare said amendment to the Constitution adopted as a part of the Constitution.

 

African slavery in the United States was an intolerable institution—but it is unquestionable that a serious error was committed when suffrage was conferred upon negroes. Without in any way disparaging the various good qualities of the colored people, they are fundamentally unfitted for citizenship in this country, where the insurmountable barrier of race forever prevents them from assimilating, and to which they were wrongfully imported in the first instance as slaves.

 

The true solution of the negro problem lies in rectifying the original mistake by returning the negroes to their homeland of Africa, with government protection and assistance, and encouraging them there to set up their own state and government, under whose aegis they can work out their own salvation and enjoy institutions fitted to their nature and present stage of development.—American Standard.